Forgiveness is an Illusion of Empathy

Say the words, I forgive you. It’s easy to convince yourself that you have, because you have said it countless times before. That phrase lingers daintily after heated arguments and broken hearts.

Can you really? Is it truly possible to sit face to face with the person that has wronged, lied, hurt or done things that caused you to question your own humanity and believe it?

For most people I would say, no. In order to access these feelings, you have to have a sense of peace that mirrors a monk. Their is certainly power behind emotion that moves us in ways we don’t always understand. In order to truly forgive, you are admitting to yourself that you can live with it; the hurt and the pain without constantly mustering feelings of animosity.

We often give ourselves too much credit and hold pride in trying to be emotionally elevated. In reality, very few people are equipped to deal with the emotional maturity that it takes to forgive someone.

If the person responsible for the event evokes extreme feelings in you, it will be nearly impossible to separate them from said event. You have to make peace with the person, in light of their indiscretions to move past whatever it is that hurt you.

For example: relationships that have dealt with infidelity, tend to circle endlessly around the cheating because the jilted lover hasn’t truly forgiven the person. The actions that resulted in the confrontation are long gone, but the semblance still remains.

The pressure to move on from situations and deal with them in a timely matter is a condition of society. Holding anger in any situation too long can get you labeled bitter, petty or just incapable of letting the past go. So, in order to side step the labels most people rather pretend.

It’s easier to rise to higher elevations by faking the healing, rather than actually taking the time needed to sew up the wounds. Friends and family will undoubtedly come to give you the proverbial pat on the back for taking the high road and finally getting over it.

If forgiveness doesn’t work for you, that’s okay too. Maybe in certain situations, it’s okay to deduce that some aren’t meant to be forgiven. For everyone else, we will run the mill and before you know it, that phrase will be ready to surface again.

…Before you say those words again, have you convinced yourself?


This post originally appeared on Medium

Energy is Transformative Not Just Transferrable

Energy can be regarded as pseudoscience that mystics are peddling at tarot card readings. Mystics and others alike will tell you it is indeed a presence—its own being. Everyone feels it; it exists between people and in situations.

Many times people refer to it as an instinct. Have you ever heard someone say, I just felt it in my gut? That’s the transference of energy. You shouldn’t discount how things make you feel because your initial emotion towards something is almost never wrong.

Interpersonal connections become stronger the longer you interact with someone. The energy that engulfs your relationship can effect you for better or worse. The notion that you are who you friends are is evident because people change to adapt to their environment—even if it seems involuntary. Depending on the value of the interaction, the transformation can be quite drastic.

The ability to spot the change in yourself is the level of self awareness you need to let it or stop it from happening. People change for a variety of reasons: the need to be liked, the joy that comes from having any connection with another person and plain coercion.

Unfortunately, self awareness is a level that is only unlocked after much hardship and undue stress. Sometimes the best way to learn your own limits is through experience. This way you can set your boundaries with others early and protect your energy.

Energy is a tool in determining which situations are useful and those that are draining. You always have the power to transform into the best version of yourself. No one can change your energy unless you let them.

 

Are You One Dimensional?

When meeting someone new, how long does it take for you to decide whether or not you want to know more about them? Five, ten or even twenty minutes? First impressions count for reasons we may not want to admit; interactions between people are highly superficial.

I am not positive if we are socialized this way or it’s instinctual. Maybe its some type of a desperate ode to the survival of the fittest. It is easy to get caught up in the semantics of it all. Who are you? What do you do? What have you done? Never realizing that we are weaponizing triumphs and failures against each other.

Learning these facts about someone else, aid in the stuffing of their entire existence into a category. Often times getting out of these assigned seats leaves someone subject to being criticized and even shamed. An example: celebrities have no place in contributing anything useful to society other than what their brand peddles.

One aspect of someone’s life is just that — one. Defining someone by arbitrary things and then punishing them when other parts are revealed, is too common. Reputations are built on this exact premise. One must exude perfection 24/7 without skipping a beat. We all have come to expect it.

The life of a person is made up of many complex factors. The different parts of you are allowed to live separately but in the same place. The pressure that we put on one another to uphold these ridiculous expectations is unrealistic.

I always find myself coming back to the line in the animated movie Shrek, where he tells Donkey that ‘ogres are made of layers’. Donkey misses the point completely but that line always resonated with me. Many times we’re so busy trying to sell our identities to people that we fool ourselves; falsely correlating to things that we aspire to be — not necessarily to who we are.

Then consequently, we apply the same rules to anyone who crosses our path. Are we buying what they are selling? If so, that’s the version of that must upheld. The cycle repeats and continues to breed superficiality. Society is robbing itself of deep and meaningful connections in the name of vanity.


This post originally appeared on Medium.